Peter Saville, Central Station, and The Factory Records.

Artworks of Central Station Desings

“It was a fantastic idea to differentiate our little cottage industry record label (run out of Alan Erasmus and Charles Sturridge’s flat in a Manchester suburb) by having sleeves that were glossier, more expensive and more beautiful than those of the multinationals. Great idea, only we never had it. We just did what we wanted to do. And then post-rationalised it. We clothed out single in glossy sixties-EP-style packages. And then men like the great and sadly late Scott Piering, Rough Trade plugger extraordinaire, would stand outside Radio One pulling the indie vinyl out of its glossy arty sleeve and inserting it into a white nondescript 7-inch bag to make it look as if it came from a major label.
“Why was packaging important to us? Because the job was a sacred one. Music had transformed our young lives, children of the sixties all. And now we were in the privileged position of putting out records ourselves. Does the Catholic Church pour its wine into mouldy earthenware pots? I think not.”

Peter Saville is an English art director and graphic designer. He came to fame for the many record covers and posters he designed for The Factory Records of which he was a director, The Factory Records was a Manchester based British independent record label, started in 1978 by Tony Wilson and Alan Erasmus, which featured several prominent musical acts on its roster such as Joy Division, New Order, A Certain Ratio, The Durutti Column.

Saville was inspired by Jan Tschichold, chief propagandist for the New Typography. According to Saville: “Malcolm had a copy of Herbert Spencer’s Pioneers of Modern Typography. The one chapter that he hadn’t reinterpreted in his own work was the cool, disciplined “New Typography” of Tschichold and its subtlety appealed to me. I found a parallel in it for the New Wave that was evolving out of Punk.”

1The beginning of it all: The poster for Factory 1 designed by Peter Saville.

2

Poster for the second birthday of The Hacienda, (Factory 51)

I loved the amazing usage of typography.
 
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Poster for the second birthday of The Hacienda, (Factory 51)
His designs are of a minimal compositions where he experimented with typography and colors.

Peter Saville, who had previously designed posters for Manchester’s Factory club in 1978, designed the cover of the album. Sumner chose the image used on the cover, which is based on an image of radio waves from pulsar CP 1919, from The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Astronomy. Saville reversed the image from black-on-white to white-on-black and printed it on textured card for the original version of the album. It is not a Fourier analysis, but rather an image of the intensity of successive radio pulses, as stated in the Cambridge Encyclopaedia. The image was originally created by radio astronomer Harold Craft at the Arecibo Observatory for his 1970 PhD thesis.

Peter Saville cover of this first Joy Division album speaks volumes. Its white on black lines reflect a pulse of power, a surge of bass, and raw angst. If the cover doesn’t draw you in, the music will.”

 

4

This is Peter Saville’s iconic design for Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures album
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A  fantastic  detailed 3D model of the design by Peter Saville
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It appeared in the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy in 1977, which is where Joy Division drummer Stephen Morris saw the design 
 
Another very important Saville work for Joy Division is Closer album cover, released shortly after Ian Curtis’ suicide in May 1980.
It was controversial album art since it reflected the tragedy Curtis suicide but was later proved that Saville had worked on the cover months before Ian’s death. (which gets me every time I read about it!)
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Staglieno Cemetery, Genova, Italy.
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Closer font and back album cover by Peter Saville
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Listen to Ceremony by Joy Division: here
Peter Saville will remain one of the greatest designers and one of the most influential and inspiring to me. His work not only reflect his masterful vision of design as an art but also his ability to merge between visuals and music.
The factory Records have released some of the most important pieces of art to date, and albums that changed music industry and remain in my top favorite albums of all time. (on an slightly unrelated note, if you are into Joy Division music or post-punk in general two albums that are great and I would recommend other than early the National and Interpol of course are Motorama’s Alps and Black Marble’s A Different Arrangement, they are so fresh with a lot of Joy Division vibes without being a rip-off. I discovered in late 2013 and was immediately in love.)
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8
Club Flyer for FAC 51, The Hacienda, Factory’s second club. 
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9
Beautiful minimal Cover by Central Station Design
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11
Factory 88 cover designed by Jackie Gribbon and The Wake.
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12
First Anniversary Party flyer for the Hacienda, as found in the archives of the Cerysmatic Factory.

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Waste Painting New Order Poster by Peter Saville’s, 2003
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A redesigned Factory Records poster,2008
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Black Monday – The Last Days of FAC251, The Factory Records Office
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A Factory poster for Record Store Day 19 April 2014 by  Trevor Johnson
a recent poster that I dig so much!
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Ambient works by three of the world’s legendary creatives set to music
 An absolutely gorgeous yet very simple poster also you can’t go wrong with Maeda, Saville and Sakamoto. Geniuses. Geniuses everywhere.
Finally, here are some famous beautiful album covers and designs made by The Central Station Design and Peter Saville. My favorite remains Technique by New Order, just ordered it in a black frame to hang it above my desk!
If you would like to know more about Saville : An interview with Peter Saville
Factory Records wasn’t just a records label that released masterpieces of music, it was also a new wave of approaching graphic design and visual communication. It represented music in a new iconic way, proved how important graphic design is to music and set the pass for many designers.

References:

Wikipedia

-Cerysmatic Factory info,  flyers: here

-Factory Records: The Compelete Graphic Album (book)

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Author: ホワイトノイズ

Visual Artist and Graphic Designer. Interested in white noise, minimalism, sci-fiction, generative art, patterns, glitch, vhs errors, non-fiction, new media art, drones, visual poetry, experimental languages, light and space

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